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Pat Gaule has travelled the world but grew up in Uffington. He's a keen local historian & amateur archaeologist, who has published a series of articles over the years.

Pat attended St Mary's primary school in Uffington, starting in 1939. He's collected some old class photos and written an article on his school memories

 

30 October 2016

 

The photo above shows a 1940s vista of Broad Street, Uffington that's now obscured by the recent 'Waylands' housing development. In the right foreground at the end of the white picket fence is a water tap that was knocked down by a passing US Army tank during the war. Read more of Pat's memories of the time, in 'Bogey Man's Lane'

After Pat left school, he worked at Grounds Farm in Uffington for around a year and a half. His memories of Grounds Farm are here.

 

 

12 June 2016

In around 2009, Jim Brown wrote about some of his memories of Uffington, and the old timber yard (on the Green. Ernie Dainty's house, with thatched roof, is on the left). Click here to read the scanned article.

Ken Painter's family was bombed out of London in WWII, and he ended up spending most of his life in Uffington. Ken remembers 'A Cockney Boy's Life in Uffington - part 1', and 'A Cockney Boy's Life in Uffington- part 2'. 

Many evacuees were taken in by households in Uffington and the villages around. After the War, Queen Elizabeth (later the Queen Mother) wrote to Mrs. Betty Minns and her husband Bert, and sent the message below to thank them for how they "opened their doors to strangers who were in need of shelter & offered to share your home with them"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Bert & Bet Minns in front of their old cottage on Upper Common

 

 

 

22 May 2016

Some memories of White Horse Hill and the Observer Corps during the War.

 

 

24 April 2016

Pat remembers the Green, where the elm tree stood, in the 1940s... here's his article on The Green, Uffington. And a few poems he's written in & about about the village.

 

 

20 March 2016

Read Pat's  The Tree 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"The Green, Uffington"  in the late 19th century. The girls on the far right are sitting on part of the roots of the old elm tree. 

 

 

 

Contact email:  comment@uffington-post.com